The Untapped Potential of Women

By: Kelly Bradley on September 25th, 2020

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The Untapped Potential of Women

Think about the best coach you ever had. Why were they the best? What attributes made them such an impactful coach?

To us, the best coaches, whether it’s a Little League coach or a financial coach, lead by example, encourage others, and help people reach their full potential.

We recently had the pleasure of speaking with someone who does just that for talented women. Candace Freedenberg is the founder of Untapped Potential, a program that prepares top female talent for work-life success and sets them up to realize their career and financial potential. 

Whether they are returning to a role in caregiving, making a career shift, or downsizing their work so that you can focus on family, Candace is passionate about supporting women. She’s a huge advocate and mentor for women to impact the wage gap, gender equality, and diversity in the workplace. 

Candace sees that her role is really about bringing people together. Whether it’s supporting corporations and their business needs, or helping candidates unleash their talents, Untapped Potential engages women to help them define their path.

It All Started When...

Candace had a thriving career in corporate America and launched innovative technologies for IBM and Kodak. She was also raising her children – and when the third one was one the way, Kodak sold the division to ITT. She was faced with a difficult choice, and decided not to relocate her family.

Instead, she dove wholeheartedly into parenting three kids and everything that goes along with that. She also spent time studying brain development, human capital, and the idea of potential.

After attending various events and conferences, she saw that many other women were struggling with the balance of working and giving back to society while also raising their families. She spoke with women that had degrees from schools like Cornell and Duke, but weren’t doing anything with it. 

Candace thought to herself, “We spend so much time focusing on the potential of our children, yet these amazingly talented women have so much to contribute themselves.”

So naturally, the question was, how do we deliver on that potential and bring that talent and passion to the marketplace?

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Helping Women Return to Work

Today, Untapped Potential helps remove barriers for women who’ve been out of the workforce for 5 or 10 years to be a parent or care for someone and are now returning. 

One of the best parts of the program is that they bring in industry mentors – women who’ve been through this same scenario before – and are now rock stars in their career. They want to show these women that it’s completely possible to get over that hump and thrive in the second act of their careers.

And like most other things we write about, it all comes down to purpose.

When you’re pursuing a career and giving up time with your family, you want to make sure that your pursuits align with your self-purpose. Your career shouldn’t suddenly become more important than your personal life or overshadow your role of being a parent.

Untapped Potential hosts workshops in which they ask challenging questions, like what would you do if you didn’t have to make money at all? How would you spend your time?

It may seem silly, but knowing the answers to these questions is really important to align the next stage of your career with your purpose in life.

The other question they ask is, what do they want out of the second stage of your career? What do you want to be known for? What's valuable enough for you to give up the time that you have with your children?

When you know the answers to these questions, you can really tap into your untapped potential. Candace talked about her programs and how they empower women on our radio show and podcast, Your Money, Your Purpose. You can listen here.

 

Learn more about the meaningful work Candace and her company, Untapped Potential is involved in here.